A Prescription to Deal with Aging Europe’s Decline

Conclusion of an article by Arthur C. Brooks, President of the American Enterprise Institute, in The New York Times, January 7

It is true that good monetary and fiscal policies are important. But the deeper problems in Europe will not be solved by the European Central Bank. No matter what the money supply and public spending levels, a country or continent will be in decline if it rejects the culture of family, turns its back on work, and closes itself to strivers from the outside.

Europe needs visionary leaders and a social movement to rediscover that people are assets to develop, not liabilities to manage. If it cannot or will not meet this existential challenge, a “lost decade” will look like a walk in the park for Grandma Europe.

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One response to “A Prescription to Deal with Aging Europe’s Decline

  1. The author’s prescription to meeting Europe’s ‘existential challenge’ – his call for ‘visionary leaders and a social movement to rediscover that people are assets to develop, not liabilities to manage’ – echoes the debate between Herman Finer (1898-1969) and Carl Friedrich (1901-84). Both were occupied with ways to enhance accountability in liberal democratic governments in order to forestall the abuse of bureaucratic power, but they came to sharply different conclusions.