Good Wishes to Our MPs

They need them. They have to decide whether or not to continue Canada’s military role in Iraq. On what basis are they to make their decision?

If they listened to the observations of Patrick Graham, one of North America’s best-informed foreign correspondents on the subject of Iraq, on CBC’s Metro Morning on March 9, they would have learned that the matter is full of complexities, that nothing is what it seems to be, and that it is extremely difficult to decide who is the good guy and who is the bad guy.

For once, the government might find it best to limit the debate and just ask Patrick Graham what to do.

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3 responses to “Good Wishes to Our MPs

  1. I’m not sure that the ability to detect that a matter is full of complexities, that nothing is what it seems to be, and that it is extremely difficult to decide who is the good guy and who is the bad guy qualifies one to suggest a course of action. Did Graham actually add any value beyond pointing out these BFOs?

  2. Scott Spiegler

    I cannot say whether Graham is the man to provide direction, but I can agree with him that war is never black and white. The more you investigate, the more you see in virtually every case that lines are blurred, it ain’t what it seems to be and there is no glory in war.

  3. What an incredible suggestion. Just because a commentator is saying something with which the reader agrees does not mean government should ceded decision making to that person.
    Western intervention hardens resistance to western influence and the greater intervention, the greater the resistance, but even that does not preclude western intervention.
    The nature of that intervention is another matter. I do not believe you can force people to believe that democracy is best.
    They have to reach that conclusion for themselves. The west underwent centuries of pain before most people accepted the value of democracy and even now that concept is fragile and prone to subversion.
    Think the money-fixated US presidential contests and the influence of so called defence organisations in a number of countries that have influenced election results with fear-mongering lies.
    That aside, think of Britain’s Winston Churchill in 1947 who said: Democracy is the worst form of government, except for all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.