Nine Reasons Why It’s Nice to be Old

The pharmaceutical industry loves us.

We are wise. It comes with age automatically.

We are out of the rat-race. We don’t have to be nice to our bosses any more.

We can enjoy our aches and pains because they prove we are still alive.

We can turn off our hearing aids when we don’t want to listen to bores.

We can choose which events in the past to forget.

Strangers are (usually) nice to us.

No need to lie about our age any more. We can boast about it.

We can look forward to our doctors reversing the aging process.

I am sorry I cannot think of a tenth reason. Perhaps you can.

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9 responses to “Nine Reasons Why It’s Nice to be Old

  1. H.L. Mencken: “The older I grow the more I distrust the familiar doctrine that age brings wisdom.” OTOH, Oliver Wendell Holmes: “The young man knows the rules, but the old man knows the exceptions.” Eric is by far the wisest person I know. (I’m sure I’m not alone in this.) He’s also, coincidentally, the oldest. Truly exceptional!

  2. Horace Krever

    We know that the widely held belief that the world is in a mess is not new.

  3. That’s my fabulous cousin Eric –
    always the optimist! Well my aging
    self misses your aging self. I must
    make another trip to Toronto soon!
    Tomorrow off to see Wolf who did
    not get the optimist gene I’m afraid!
    Much much love to my favorite
    relative!
    Your Fan from the land of Trump

  4. Since the world is of course going to hell in a handbasket, it is increasingly unlikely to arrive on our watch.

  5. king townsend

    A tenth reason? Surely Sketches themselves. A joy for all ages but the creation of our very own elder statesman. So # 10 !!!

  6. Michael Gundy

    Dear Eric, I look forward to celebrating your birthday soon.

  7. Elisabeth Ecker

    I love being old, the only thing I don’t like is that is will not last.

  8. mike holliday

    Surely another reason would be that getting old is infinitely preferable to the alternative

  9. Getting old today means enjoying the ailments that most of our grandparents never lived long enough to suffer from.