How to Spot a Communist Using Literary Criticism: A 1955 Manual from the U.S. Military

Source: Open Culture

While a preference for long sentences is common to most Communist writing, a distinct vocabulary provides the more easily recognized feature of the “Communist language.” Even a superficial reading of an article written by a Communist or a conversation with one will probably reveal the use of some of the following expressions: integrative thinking, vanguard, comrade, hootenanny, chauvinism, book-burning, syncretistic faith, bourgeois-nationalism, jingoism, colonialism, hooliganism, ruling class, progressive, demagogy, dialectical, witch-hunt, reactionary, exploitation, oppressive, materialist.

This list, selected at random, could be extended almost indefinitely. While all of the above expressions are part of the English language, their use by Communists is infinitely more frequent than by the general public….

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3 responses to “How to Spot a Communist Using Literary Criticism: A 1955 Manual from the U.S. Military

  1. infinitely more frequent ?!

  2. They forgot “democratic centralism.” And for German speakers “alleinvertretungsanmassung — GDR (DDR) people used to use it as an accusation against West Germans. (I won’t have a go at trying to translate it. :)) ) The word describes West Germany’s claim to represent all Germans.